Death of wild life from “non-point” polluters hard to establish
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Wednesday, 17 July 2013 11:40

 

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The wild life of Indian River Lagoon in the eastern Florida coast which has been a leading haven for 600 species of fish and sea mammals and 300 species of birds is in jeopardy now.

Scientists have started to attach a new term to the death of wildlife across the globe – describing it as coming from non-point polluters. This means that it is unlikely to have come from one source, but that a mix of pollution issues have caused the deaths.

The non-point pollution's major suspects though are connected to fertilizer phosphorous and nitrogen in the lagoon or waterways that connect to the lagoon.

Central Florida has a large phosphate mining and fertilizer production industry.

In the last few years there have been increasing numbers of events where the actual cause is difficult to address including crop failures, dead farm animals and sick humans in central Florida near fertiliser plants and the deaths of thousands of species along the Florida coast because of the destruction of their usual feeding habitat.

Dolphins are dying everyday, manatees (sea cows) dying one a week. Over 300 pelicans, 46 dolphins, and 111 manatees have died since June 20 2013.

And their natural habitat is being destructed… One scientist compared losing 47,000 acres of sea grass bed to losing a rain forest.

The environmental group, Earth Justice, whose slogan is "Because the Earth Needs a Good Lawyer," has suggested "Powerful interests who profit from free disposal of pollutants in public waterways are fighting new standards, and they have allies in Congress and in Tallahassee (Florida state capitol)."


Vetoed study

It is also pointed out that the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has had its influence eroded by the appointment of Governor Rick Scott. It is claimed that people from polluting companies have been employed by the agency. A further congressional bill which would study the animal deaths occurring along the Florida Coast has been vetoed.

 

 

 original article: http://www.naturalnews.com/041071_animal_deaths_pollution_toxic_algae.html